Internet Infidelity

JMFT
The always-great Journal of Marital and Family Therapy is out this month with a special edition on MFT and Cyberspace. Among the findings:

  • MFTs should be aware that using the Internet as a social tool is now normal for kids and adolescents. There are assessment tools now available, including the Internet Sex Screening Test – Adolescent Version, to determine whether an adolescent’s behavior warrants treatment.
  • Just like in non-Internet relationships, men show greater concern over women’s sexual infidelity, and women show greater concern over men’s emotional infidelity.
  • Among a sample of university students, neither men nor women believed that a cybersex relationship implied a love relationship (or vice versa).
  • Over the past two years, therapists report an increased frequency of clients coming to therapy to address cybersex issues. Many therapists feel unprepared for this work.
  • Therapists apparently allow several biases to impact their assessment and treatment of internet infidelity cases. Therapist decisions are impacted by factors including the client’s gender, therapist’s age, therapist’s gender, therapist’s religiosity, and therapist’s personal experiences with infidelity. In regard to client gender, men are far more likely to be labeled “sex addicts” than are women engaging in identical behaviors.
  • For family members concerned about a loved one’s cybersex behavior, there is an empirically-supported and manualized method for bringing that person into treatment, known as the ARISE model.

All fascinating stuff. I’ve seen in my own practice a number of couples dealing with issues of internet infidelity over the past few years, and suspect that this will only become more common. It’s good to see our field pursuing assessment and treatment models that specifically address it.